House Intelligence Committee subpoenas Mick Mulvaney for impeachment inquiry testimony

Acting White House chief of staff Mick Mulvaney has been subpoenaed to appear before the House Intelligence Committee as part of the impeachment inquiry into President Donald Trump, an official working on the inquiry says

           

https://www.facebook.com/cnn/posts/10160096098601509

How quaint , how sweet The House still believe in the rules. They must think we are still back when Bill Clinton was being impeached. That administration acted as if it was not a sham impeachment, and even showed respect to the Congress.

BREAKING NEWS..........

America has disappeared down the rabbit hole!

It actually happened on January 21, 2017 when the first formal news announcement from the then newly elected spokesman for POTUS,announced the POTUS's crowd size was bigger than the previous Presidents of the U.S. Yep, everyone, that's when our slippery slope began.


SARGENT AT ARMS – HOUSE & SENATE

From there, we can treat ourselves to a tour of a seldom-used congressional power: the power of each house to use its own sergeant-at-arms to enforce its own rules and privileges. It sounds quaint, but just think:

CONGRESS DOESN’T NEED A U.S. MARSHAL TO KNOCK ON AN EXECUTIVE BRANCH MEMBER’S DOOR—IT CAN ARREST THEM ALL BY ITSELF.

The United States has its own historical antecedents. In 1832, Sam Houston (that Sam Houston), then a private citizen, assaulted Ohio Rep. William Stanbery as Stanbery was walking home in Washington, D.C. According to Stanbery, Houston was indignant over something that Stanbery had said in a floor debate. Stanbery reported the assault to the House, which ordered its sergeant-at-arms to “take in custody, wherever to be found, the body of Samuel Houston; and the same in his custody to keep, subject to the further order and direction of this House.” Houston was arrested and brought before the House, where he was represented by Francis Scott Key (that Francis Scott Key). After a monthlong trial, he was reprimanded and sent on his way.
Alas, it has been quite some time since a house of Congress sent its sergeant-at-arms trolling the streets of Washington for wrongdoers.
Under current federal law, it’s a criminal offense to refuse to appear before Congress when summoned or to commit perjury before a congressional committee. Such offenders are supposed to be prosecuted by U.S. attorneys.
But that’s exactly the problem with regard to the DOJ-related subpoenas—the people getting the subpoenas and the people enforcing them all work for the same boss.
FEDERAL LAW CAN ALLOW THE EXECUTIVE TO PUNISH DISOBEDIENCE TO CONGRESS, BUT IT CANNOT TAKE AWAY CONGRESS’ OWN PUNISHMENT POWERS.
Back in 1833, Supreme Court Justice Joseph Story said those powers were utterly necessary “for either house to perform its constitutional functions,” a conclusion also reached by the Supreme Court as a whole in 1821.

Once a house of Congress finds someone in contempt, it can order its sergeant to go after him. It’s really that simple.
And that’s as it should be: As the Congress understood when it scooped up Sam Houston, accepting help from the executive means subordination to the executive.
The legislature can least afford this when it is the executive that is under investigation.
The sergeants of the houses of Congress already have all the power they need. Giuliani, Sondland, Pompeo, Mc Ghan Barr, …..—Congress, go get ‘em! COOPERATE or LOCK THEM UP until they do.


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